Engineering Graphics H167

Engineering Fundamentals & Laboratory II  (4 Credits)

 

Classrooms:  HI 206 or HI 346                   Laboratory:  HI 208

 

Instructors:                        John Demel                        Demel.1@osu.edu                           HI 244E                        292-2427, 901-2996

                        Rick Freuler                        Freuler.1@osu.edu                        HI 244H                         688-0499, 436-2202

                        Mike Miller                        Miller.94@osu.edu                        HI 305                         292-2080, 854-0675

 

GTAs:                       Edgar Casale                       Casale.3@osu.edu                       HI 203                       688-0436      

                       Raja Laifa Clouse                       Laifa.1@osu.edu                       HI 203                       688-0436

                       Erik Justen                       Justen.4@osu.edu                       HI 203                       688-0436

                       Brad Skotko                       Skotko.1@osu.edu                       HI 203                       688-0436

 

UTAs:                       James Beams                       Beams.2@osu.edu                       Matt Beerman                       Beerman.2@osu.edu

                       Kevin Berndsen           Berndsen.1@osu.edu           Ryan Bockbrader           Bockbrader.8@osu.edu       

                       Dan Crowell            Crowell.17@osu.edu           Matt Gates           Gates.73@osu.edu    

                       Ryan Gero           Gero.4@osu.edu           Leo Glimcher           Glimcher.3@osu.edu

                       Barry Hubbard           Hubbard.60@osu.edu           Melissa Murphy           Murphy.473@osu.edu          

                       John Neyer            Neyer.3@osu.edu           Ted Pavlic           Pavlic.3@osu.edu      

                       Shawn Pearson           Pearson.112@osu.edu           Tai Pimputkar           Pimputkar.2@osu.edu          

                       Jeff Radigan           Radigan.4@osu.edu           Eric Schmidt           Schmidt.298@osu.edu          

                       Talib Sharif           Sharif.5@osu.edu           Sean Smith           Smith.3700@osu.edu

                       Brian Thiry           Thiry.2@osu.edu           Ken Wilkins           Wilkins.78@osu.edu

 

Introduction and Course Organization:

 

Engineering Graphics H167 is your second course in engineering problem solving and includes Engineering Problem Solving, Computer Programming, and Engineering Laboratory.  This course is the second in a three-course sequence of Engineering Graphics and is coordinated with either Math 162G or Math 152A and with Physics 132E/G courses.  This course meets four times each week for a 108-minute class period Monday through Thursday.  Students may need some additional unscheduled computer lab time to complete their assignments.  During the scheduled labs the students are expected to work on the daily assignments related to the lecture topic or on their current Engineering Laboratory project.

 

For most of the class periods, the class will meet in the scheduled classroom (either HI 206 or HI 346) for a 108‑minute session which will have a lecture component followed by a daily exercise or programming/computer lab component.  For one class period in seven out of the ten weeks, the class will go to lab (in HI 208) for a scheduled hands-on laboratory exercise on either Wednesday or Thursday.  There will be no hands-on laboratory exercise in the first week and the last week of the quarter or in those weeks when a mid-term examination is scheduled.

 

Course Objectives:

 

Engineering Graphics H167 is the second of a three integrated courses that provide the engineering student with a fundamental understanding of problem solving, engineering graphics and communication, computer programming, and laboratory experimentation.  Engineering Graphics H167 presents concepts of computer programming in an engineering problem solving environment.  Emphasis is on problem solving techniques and writing engineering reports.  Algorithms are developed for repetitive operations, decision making, and evaluation of alternative courses of action.  Techniques are presented for problem decomposition into manageable modules.  Included in this section of EG H167 are seven “hands-on” team-oriented engineering laboratory experiments with an introduction to data acquisition and data analysis.  

 

Programming constructs for implementation of repetitive operations and decision making/branching are developed and presented in a generic as well as programming-language-specific format.  Computation/numerical programming is emphasized.  Programming concepts are presented in a language-independent manner and implemented in C/ C++.  An introduction to MATLAB will also be presented.

 

Upon completing this course, and its Engineering Graphics prerequisite, the students will have developed effective techniques for analyzing engineering problems, developing algorithms for their solution, and writing an engineering report on their solution.  They will have received a solid grounding in computer programming with C/ C++ and an introduction to MATLAB, and they will have seen examples of alternative languages.  They will have developed a good understanding of the way engineering drawings are created on a computer system.  They will have programmed and used two major types of computer systems in the College of Engineering: personal computers and workstations.

 

Upon successful completion of the course the student should be able to:

 

1.      Understand problem solving methods and procedures in order to solve elementary engineering problems.

 

2.      Develop computer algorithms; construct logic diagrams; prepare, run, and report on computer programs to solve assigned problems using the REGION ONE Computer Laboratory UNIX Workstation computing systems, C/ C++, and MATLAB.

 

3.      Demonstrate a working knowledge of: 

(1) Terminal or workstation operation;

(2) UNIX Command Language;

(3) vi and/or other UNIX editor;

(4) C/C++ programming language;

(5) Interactive programming techniques;

(6) Program testing and debugging;

(7) Graphic and alphanumeric screen output;

(8) An interactive environment for numerical computation, data analysis, and graphics – MATLAB;

(9) Data validation techniques;

(10) Laboratory procedures and data acquisition fundamentals;

(11) Proper documentation and reporting methods.

 

4.      Set up computer systems to monitor and interact with the physical world, including experiments with data acquisition, real time data analysis, and programmed logic control.


Assignments and Grading:

 

Daily assignments will be due at the beginning of the lecture periods.  Seven hands-on laboratory problems will be submitted with formal reports.  Examinations will include six scheduled 10-minute quizzes, several un-announced hands-on lab quizzes, two 100-minute midterms, and one two-hour final exam.  The course letter grade will be based on the sum of the products of average grade received and percent assigned for each of the following areas:

 

Component of Course Grade

Percent

Daily Assignments (25)

25%

Engineering Hands-on Lab Projects (7)

21%

Midterm Examinations (2)

22%

Quizzes (6)

12%

Journal Entries (10)

5%

Final Exam (1)

15%

 

Each student enrolled in the course will receive a letter grade after completion of all parts of the assigned work in a manner that is satisfactory to the course instructors.

 

Daily Assignments, Engineering Laboratory Problems, and Journals:

 

Daily assignments are to be submitted by including a copy of the computer program source code and computer-produced output stapled together with the assignment handout sheet.  Due dates are indicated for all daily assignments.  A penalty will be assessed for late work.

 

A formal report is to be submitted for each of the Engineering Laboratory problems.  Due dates are indicated on the schedule.  Late reports will be penalized.

 

Journal entries must be submitted electronically to journal@www-gateway.eng.ohio-state.edu by no later than 11:59 PM each Sunday.  Late journal entries may be penalized.

 

The solution to an assignment or a laboratory problem must represent each student's own work except for work done by students assigned to teams.  It is considered unlikely that students working independently will arrive at identical solutions, that is, exactly the same computer programs and results.  A UNIX system account is established for each student enrolled in Engineering Graphics H167.  Students are expected to follow all the rules of the computer labs at all times.  Among these rules are neither food, drink, nor smoking are permitted in the lab.  In addition, each student must use his or her account only.  The sharing of account information, such as a password, is prohibited.

Course Materials: (All required, except as noted)

·        EG H167 Winter 2001 Course Packet (available at COPEZ) consisting of:

"Class Notes"

"Lecture Notes"

"Daily Assignments"

·        Required Text – Introduction to MATLAB for Engineers, by William J. Palm III

·        Required Text – C How to Program, by Deitel & Deitel (3rd. Edition)

·        Access-required Text – The New Way Things Work, by Macauly, (1998 or 1988)

·        3.5 inch floppy disks (at least 2) or a Zip disk


 


CLASS  DAY

PRB.  NO.    

 

TOPIC

READING     ASSIGNMENT

 

DUE

 

  01-02

 

Class organization. Course introduction.  Engineering problem solving evaluation.

Syllabus

 

 

 

 

01-03

D1

Introduction to engineering problem solving techniques and algorithms.  Problem identification, requirements for solution, developing and executing plans for solving problems, reporting the results.

CN Sec. 1,2,3, DD Chap. 1, IM Sec. 1.5

 

 

 

  01-04

D2

Structured approach to engineering problem solving: organizing tasks, top-down design techniques, logic diagrams, purpose of logic diagrams, types of logic diagrams, flow charts, action diagrams, pseudo code.

DD Sec. 3.1-3.10

D1

 

 

01-08

D3

The UNIX computing environment.  Workstations, UNIX, X windows, networked environment, data & program files, login, vi editor. C program structure. Executable, assignment statements.

CN Sec. 4,5,7,8

 

D2

 

 

01-09

D4

QUIZ #1.  Data types in C/C++.  int, long, float, double, char, enum.  Math operators.  Math library math.h,  increment, decrement operators.  Shortcuts.

DD Sec. 2.5,2.6,

3.11,3.12,

 

D3

 

 

01-10

or

01-11

D5

Writing algorithms in computer language.  Input and output functions in C: scanf, printf, getc, putc, getchar, putchar.  stdio.h and stdlib.h header files.

DD Chap. 9

D4

 

 

01-11

or

01-10

Lab 1

Engineering Laboratory – Data Acquisition Principles.

Handout on www-gateway web pages

 

 

 

01-15

 

No Classes – Martin Lurther King Holiday

 

 

 

 

 

01-16

D6

QUIZ #2.  Data files in C: Opening, Closing, fopen, fclose. Reading, Writing. fscanf, fprintf.

DD Sec. 11.1-11.5

 

D5

 

 

01-17

or

01-18

D7

Logical and relational operators. Control statements – branching: if, if-else, if-else if-else.

DD Sec. 3.4-3.6,

4.10-4.11

 

D6

 

 

01-18

or

01-17

Lab 2

Engineering Laboratory – Material Joining and Beam Bending.

Handout on www-gateway web pages

Lab 1

 

Key to abbreviations:  CN = Class Notes;  DD = Deitel & Deitel;  IM = Introduction To MATLAB


 


CLASS  DAY

PRB.  NO.    

 

TOPIC

READING ASSIGNMENT

 

DUE

01-22

D8

Control  statements – branching:  switch-case.  The

break statement.

DD Sec. 4.7,4.9

D7

01-23

D9

Control structures – Repetition: indefinite iteration,

while, do-while loops; definite iteration, for loops

DD Sec. 3.7-3.9,

DD Chap. 4

 

D8

01-24

D10

Arrays – Assigning values to array elements,

character strings, processing array data.

DD Chap. 6

D9

01-25

 

MIDTERM EXAM #1.

 

 

01-29

D11

User-written function sub-programs.  Function prototypes, the return statement, returning one value.

DD Sec. 5.1-5.12

D10

01-30

D12

Pointers. Functions returning more than one value, referencing and de-referencing variables.

DD Chap. 7

D11

01-31

or

02-01

D13

Pointers. Use of pointers in array processing.

DD Sec. 7.8,7.10

D12

02-01

or

01-31

Lab 3

Engineering Laboratory – Stress and Strain.

Handout on www-gateway web pages

Lab 2

02-05

D14

QUIZ #3.  Characters and strings. ctype.h, stdlib.h, stdio.h, and string.h library functions.

DD Chap. 8

D13

02-06

D15

Introduction to MATLAB.  Vectors and matrices, syntax, operators, simple plotting.

IM Chap. 1,

IM Sec. 2.1-2.3, 4.1

D14

02-07

or

02-08

D16

Preprocessor directives, macros, user libraries, user header files.

 

DD Sec. 13.1-13.5, 13.7

D15

02-08

or

02-07

Lab 4

Engineering Laboratory – Aerodynamics and Propulsion.

Handout on www-gateway web pages

Lab 3,

02-12

Hand Out 1

More on user libraries.

 

 

02-13

 

QUIZ #4.  Programming the Handy Board.

Handout 1

D16

02-14

or

02-15

D17

Data structures struct, union. Defining, initializing, accessing, using. Enumerated data types enum.

DD Chap. 10

 

02-15

or

02-14

Lab 5

Engineering Laboratory – The Stoplight.  (Computer control of a physical device.)

Handout on www-gateway web pages

Lab 4,

Key to abbreviations:  CN = Class Notes;  DD = Deitel & Deitel; IM = Introduction To MATLAB


 

CLASS  DAY

PRB.  NO.    

 

TOPIC

READING ASSIGNMENT

 

DUE

02-19

 

MIDTERM EXAM #2.

 

 

 

02-20

D18

C++ enhancements to C.

DD Chap. 15

D17

 

02-21

or

02-22

D19

C++ classes and data abstraction.  

DD Chap. 16

D18

Lab 5

 

02-22

or

02-21

Lab 6

Engineering Laboratory – Spot Speeds

Handout on www-gateway web pages

 

 

02-26

D20

C++ stream input/output. Screen and file I/O iostream.h and fstream.h header files.

DD Sec. 21.1- 21.5

 

D19

 

02-27

D21

QUIZ #5.  C++ stream input/output.  Stream manipulators, format states, error states.  User defined types.

DD Sec. 21.6 - 21.8

 

D20

Lab 6

 

03-01

or

03-02

D22

Introduction to MATLAB. Use of MATLAB for data analysis. The diary command. MATLAB script M-files.

IM Sec. 3.1 - 3.2

D21

 

03-02

or

03-01

Lab 7

Engineering Laboratory – PID Controllers.

Handout on www-gateway web pages

 

 

03-05

D23

 

MATLAB script and function M-files.MATLAB logical and relational operators.

IM Sec. 3.5, 6.1 - 6.4,

D22

 

03-06

D24

QUIZ #6. MATLAB I/O commands, fopen, fclose, fgets, sscanf, input, printf.

IM Sec. 3.3

D23

 

 

03-07

D25

Solving simultaneous equations with MATLAB. More MATLAB plotting.

IM Sec. 5.1 - 5.2, 4.2-4.3

Lab 7, D24

 

03-08

 

Summary and review for final exam.  Course evaluation and assessment.

 

 

D25

 

Key to abbreviations:  CN = Class Notes;  DD = Deitel/Deitel; IM = Introduction To MATLAB

    

  Final Exam will be:                           For 7:30 am Section – Tue., March 13, 7:30 am to 9:18 am.

                          For 9:30 am Section – Tue., March 13, 9:30 am to 11:18 am.

                          For 1:30 pm Section – Tue., March 13, 1:30 pm to 3:18 pm.

                          For 3:30 pm Section – Tue., March 13, 3:30 pm to 5:18 pm.


 

Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology - Program Criteria

 

Engineering programs must demonstrate that their graduates have:                                     Introduced in this course:

 

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering                           Yes        

(b) and ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data                Some,Yes             

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs                       Some

(d) ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams                                                Yes        

(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems                                               Yes        

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility                                       Yes        

(g) an ability to communicate effectively                                             Yes        

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in

                a global and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary                              Yes        

                for engineering practice